Month: July 2017

Where the Oatmeal comes from

Years and years of eating porridge and flapjacks, of collecting tokens from the packets, and only now I visit the source of all this delicious oatmeal. It dawned on me that many of the farmers on the east coast of Ireland were growing oats for the factory.

It took a visit to the Waterford Greenway, linking Waterford

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to Dungarven on a 48km stretch of disused railway for me to make the connection between my breakfast , the mill and the crop grown to make it.

Sitting in the Coach House cafe near Kilmacthomas, I felt I had to walk at least some of it if I was to get bragging rights for having been on the Grenway.

So I walked the 1 km to Kilmacthomas village. Signs for the Mill but no actual sighting. Reillys traditional butchers where you can see them making sausages. No card machine-I was nearly checking to see that they had switched to the decimal system. Had to buy some wagon wheels eventhough they were made for children. A round of sausage meat with an circle of black pudding in the middle and finished off with pastry trimming as the wheel rim. I baked one later in the oven and they were a real treat.

But back to KIlmacthomas and the Oatmeal. I wandered down the hill to the river. I was able to get back to the greemway by walking up to the Kilmacthomas viaduct. Enormous arches holdung up the now disused railway line.

Up here I could look beyond the village. There in all its industrial magnificence was the Flahavans oat mill. I looked below and saw the river. Duh! Mill – has a millrace. Seems obvious but of course it would have originally been powered by water.

It is a beautiful setting and looking over my other shoulder, I could see the village. I had an ‘Under Milkwood’ moment when I observed the comings and goings of the place from a distance.

It was a revelation to me that my chilhood bowls of porridge had come from here. I would say there is not a child in Ireland who has not sat dejected in front of a bowl of porridge and been told not to leave the table until its finished. The misery of seeing snakes coiling in the bowl while anothe bite is forced down. This food has become aclaimed for its low glycaemic index in latter years and it has enjoyed a revival unparalled by any other food except maybe avocadoes.

And still it comes from a mill on a river in a splendid corner of our beautiful country.

Espresso Brownie

Anything chocolatey and gooey in the centre – delish
With the hazelnut and dark chocolate this recipe has healthy credentials.

oliveoilandlemon

Does Espresso in a brownie make them breakfast?
They are nice enough to have anytime of the day but maybe that’s stretching it. What ever about that, they really are delicious…..
Please be brave and take them out when they are still gooey in the middle as that is the hallmark of a really delicious brownie!

Cuts into 16
Oven at 180C

50ml good quality espresso
200gr dark chocolate
150gr butter

150gr sugar
3 eggs

50gr plain flour (You can substitute almond flour or an other gluten free flour of your choice)
100gr hazlenuts, toast gently, skin and chop

Melt the chocolate, butter and espresso gently over a bain marie
Whisk the sugar and eggs together
Fold in the flour followed by the melted chocolate mixture
Add the hazlenuts and pour into a greased lined tin approx 10″ by 10″
Bake for between 15-20 minutes. This is because all ovens…

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